Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes SORNA Project

Sex Offender Registration and Notification Act

Mission Statement

The Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes of Oklahoma place great importance on the safety of all citizens, both native and non-native. Consequently, the presence of convicted sex offenders residing on, or moving through “Indian Country”, can threaten the very safety, health, and welfare of our tribal members. The Tribes have established a sex offender registry system for such individuals residing on, working on, or going to school within the jurisdictional boundaries. The Cheyenne and Arapaho SORNA team is committed to keeping our community safe.

SORNA Project History

In 1994 the United States Congress passed the Jacob Wetterling Crimes Against Children and Sexually Violent Offender Registration Act. This act established guidelines for states to track sex offenders by requiring them to confirm a sex offender’s place of residence annually for ten years after release, or quarterly for the rest of their lives, if the sex offense was a violent sex crime. In 1996 the Jacob Wetterling Act was amended by what is commonly known as Megan’s Law. This amendment provides for public disclosure and dissemination of certain information from sex offender registries. As a result, state and local law enforcement were required to make certain information about offenders public.
In 2003 the Prosecutorial Remedies and Other Tools to end the Exploitation of Children Today (PROTECT) Act was passed, which, in part, required the Department of Justice to maintain a sex offender website with links to each state sex offender website. That site is known as The Dru Sjodin National Sex Offender Public Website.
Finally, in 2006 the Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act was passed. Between the passage of the Jacob Wetterling Act in 2004 and the Adam Walsh Act in 2006, tribes came up on the radar. Certain courts in Public Law 280 states had found that state sex offender registry and notification laws were essentially civil regulatory in nature. Due to the nature of federal Indian law, this meant states had no jurisdiction to impose their sex offender laws on tribal lands, thereby creating a gap in the national registry system. Consequently, Title 1 of the Adam Walsh Act sought to close that gap by requiring tribes to either opt in to the national registry system or have their jurisdiction over such matters transferred to states. Title 1 is known as the Sex Offender Registration and Notification Act (SORNA).
SORNA refers to the Sex Offender Registration and Notification Act which is Title I of the Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act of 2006 (Public Law 248-109). SORNA provides a comprehensive set of minimum standards for sex offender registration and notification in the United States.SORNA aims to close potential gaps and loopholes that existed under prior law and generally strengthens the nationwide network of sex offender registration and notification programs.
· Incorporates a more comprehensive group of sex offenders and sex offenses for which registration is required.
· Requires registered sex offenders to register and keep their registration current in each jurisdiction in which they reside, work, or go to school.
· Requires sex offenders to provide more extensive registration information.
· Requires sex offenders to make periodic in-person appearances to verify and update their registration information.
· Expands the amount of information available to the public regarding registered sex offenders.
· Makes changes in the required minimum duration of registration for sex offenders.
Individuals who have been convicted of a qualifying sex offense as outlined in the Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes Sex Offender Registration Code or the Federal Sex Offender Registration and Notification Act must register as a sex offender with the Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes if:
(CROSS STREETS are Black Kettle Blvd. and Tall Bull Rd.)
P.O. Box 102
Concho, OK 73022-0102
You may view our progress at http://catribes.nsopw.gov/
If you are interested in seeing if a sex offender resides in your vicinity please click www.nsopw.gov to do a search. Also the Oklahoma Registry can be found at www.doc.state.ok.us
SORNA Technical Assistant
tfaris@c-a-tribes.org
405-422-7450
Paul Fuentes
SORNA Project Coordinator
pfuentes@c-a-tribes.org

On June 12, 2007 the Legislature approved and the Governor signed a Bill electing to participate in the National Sex Offender Registry System approving and authorizing the Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes to act as a sex offender registry jurisdiction.

What does the term SORNA mean?

SORNA refers to the Sex Offender Registration and Notification Act which is Title I of the Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act of 2006 (Public Law 248-109). SORNA provides a comprehensive set of minimum standards for sex offender registration and notification in the United States.SORNA aims to close potential gaps and loopholes that existed under prior law and generally strengthens the nationwide network of sex offender registration and notification programs.

· Extends the jurisdictions in which registration is required beyond the 50 states, the District of Columbia, and the           principal U.S. territories, to include also federally recognized Indian tribes.
· Incorporates a more comprehensive group of sex offenders and sex offenses for which registration is required.
· Requires registered sex offenders to register and keep their registration current in each jurisdiction in which they           reside, work, or go to school.
· Requires sex offenders to provide more extensive registration information.
· Requires sex offenders to make periodic in-person appearances to verify and update their registration information.
· Expands the amount of information available to the public regarding registered sex offenders.
· Makes changes in the required minimum duration of registration for sex offenders.


Who must register with tribes under SORNA?

a. They were convicted by the Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes of the qualifying offense,

b. They were incarcerated by or with the Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes for the qualifying offense,

c. They reside within the exterior boundaries of the Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes Reservation or otherwise reside on property owned by the Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes in fee or trust regardless of location,

d. They are employed (including volunteer work regardless of compensation) by the Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes in any capacity or otherwise are employed within the exterior boundaries of the Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes Reservation or on property owned by the Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes in fee or trust regardless of location, or

e. They are a student, in any capacity, within the exterior boundaries of the Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes Reservation or on property owned by the Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes in fee or trust regardless of location.

Where Do Sex Offenders Register with the Tribes?

Sex Offenders can register with the tribes through the SORNA Team, at the Cheyenne and Arapaho Trial Court. We are located at the North end of Concho.
(CROSS STREETS are Black Kettle Blvd. and Tall Bull Rd.)

The address to the Trial Court: 700 Black Kettle Blvd.
P.O. Box 102
Concho, OK 73022-0102

We are currently working on our tribal sex offender website; it will be updated frequently.
You may view our progress at http://catribes.nsopw.gov
If you are interested in seeing if a sex offender resides in your vicinity please click http://www.nsopw.gov to do a national search. Also the Oklahoma Registry can be found at http://www.doc.state.ok.us

For more information on SORNA please contact:

Theresa Faris
SORNA Technical Assistant
405-422-7450

Paul Fuentes
SORNA Project Coordinator
405-422-7760